MHLU - Health Status Resource

Sexually Transmitted and Blood-borne Infections

Sexually Transmitted and Blood-borne Infections

Key Findings: 
  • Between 2000 and 2010 the overall number of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reported in Middlesex-London increased. This was largely due to increases in the number of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis infections reported during the 11-year time period. Newly identified hepatitis C and HIV/AIDS infections remained relatively stable (Fig. 8.17).
  • For chlamydia and gonorrhea infections, there were more reported female cases than males (Fig. 8.18 and Fig. 8.21). This may be due to more frequent screening among females and does not necessarily reflect greater incidence of infections.
  • There was a greater number of hepatitis C, HIV/AIDS and infectious syphilis infections reported among males in Middlesex-London than females (Fig. 8.24, Fig. 8.27 and Fig. 8.33).
  • Between 2006 and 2010, rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea infections reported in Middlesex-London were highest among 15 to 24 year olds (Fig. 8.19 and Fig. 8.22), while for infectious syphilis, the rate was highest among those in their 20s (Fig. 8.33).  Between 2005 and 2015, the rate of hepatitis C infections was highest among those aged 25-34 (Fig 8.25).
  • Between 2000 and 2010, the rate of newly diagnosed HIV infections was highest among 30 to 34 year olds in Middlesex-London (Fig. 8.28).
  • Among females newly diagnosed with an HIV infection, sex with an opposite sex partner (58.7%) was the most frequently reported risk factor, followed by travelling to or living in an area where HIV is endemic (41.3%) (Fig. 8.30). Nearly one-half of males newly diagnosed with HIV reported sex with a same sex partner (49.1%) as a risk factor, while 29.0% of male cases reported sex with an opposite sex partner (Fig. 8.31). Injection drug use was reported as a risk factor by more than 16% of females and males diagnosed with HIV (Fig. 8.30 and Fig. 8.31).
  • Compared to Ontario, the rates of chlamydia were significantly higher in Middlesex-London across the 11-year time period (Fig. 8.20). Similarly, rates of gonorrhea and hepatitis C were significantly higher in Middlesex-London compared to Ontario since the mid-2000s (Fig. 8.23 and Fig. 8.26).  Between 2005 and 2015, the reported rate of HIV/AIDS in Middlesex-London gradually increased, and was significantly higher than Ontario in 2015 (Fig 8.29).  The reasons for this are unknown; however, some of this difference may be due to the greater proportion of 20 to 29 year olds in Middlesex-London compared to Ontario, relatively more testing being performed in Middlesex-London and therefore more frequent detection of infection, or greater levels of disease occurring in the community. 
How this Indicator was Calculated: