MHLU - Health Status Resource

Leading Types of Cancer

Leading Types of Cancer

Key Findings: 
  • Using data averages from 2005 to 2007, the crude incidence rate of all cancers was higher in males compared to females but the rate of death from cancer was similar in both sexes (Fig. 6.17).
  • The cancers with highest incidence was breast cancer in females and prostate cancer in males; however the leading cause of cancer death in both sexes was lung cancer.  This indicates that although fewer people get lung cancer, a higher proportion of those with lung cancer die compared to other cancers (Fig. 6.17).
  • The rate of incident cases and deaths from all types of cancer (excluding breast) was higher in males than females (Fig. 6.17).
  • Rates of prostate cancer incidence in males increased significantly between 1988 and 2007 (Fig. 6.18).
  • Melanoma incidence rates increased in both males and females between 1988 and 2007 (Fig. 6.18).
  • Lung cancer incidence rates in males have decreased over time whereas in females the rate increased.  Despite the decline in males, their rate was still significantly higher than that of females (Fig. 6.18).
  • Oral cancer and melanoma incidence rates were both significantly higher in males than females in 2007 (Fig. 6.18).
  • Males and females in Middlesex-London had significantly lower rates of lung cancer incidence than the Peer Group (Fig. 6.19).
  • No differences were seen for cancers in females, except Middlesex-London had a lower rate of lung cancer than the Peer Group (Fig. 6.19).
  • Males in Middlesex-London had significantly higher incidence rates of melanoma and oral cancers than males in Ontario.  Males in Middlesex-London had significantly higher rates of prostate cancer than males in Ontario and the Peer group (Fig. 6.19
How this Indicator was Calculated: 
Ontario Public Health Standard: 

Population Health Assessment and Surveillance Protocol - Section 1, Subsections b-iii, vii

Chronic Disease Prevention Standard - Requirement #1