MHLU - Health Status Resource

Child and Youth Mortality

Child and Youth Mortality

Key Findings: 

Infant Deaths

  • An average of 24 Middlesex-London infants died each year from 2007 to 2009 (Fig. 10.3).
  • For Middlesex-London infants, the leading cause of death, constituting 55% of infant deaths, was perinatal conditions; a further 25% of deaths were due to birth defects. These leading causes of death of infants were ranked the same for Ontario and the Peer Group (Fig. 10.3).
  • The mortality rate for infants (ie < 1 year of age) in Middlesex-London, is about 30 times higher than the mortality rate for ages 1 to 9 (Fig. 10.1).
  • Male infants in Middlesex-London were 48% more likely to die than female infants (Fig. 10.2) whereas males ages 10 to 19 were twice as likely die than their female counterparts (Fig. 10.2).
  • Deaths Ages 1 - 9

  • An average of 8 children ages 1 to 9 in Middlesex-London died each year from 2007 to 2009 (Fig. 10.3).
  • The top three causes of death in this age group were due to unintentional injuries (namely drowning and suffocation comprising 15% of deaths; followed closely by cancer (namely brain, liver, and lymph and blood cancers) (14%); and birth defects (13%). These top three causes of death ranked the same for Ontario and the Peer Group (Fig. 10.3).
  • Deaths Ages 10 - 19

  • An average of 13 children ages 10 to 19 in Middlesex-London died each year from 2007 to 2009 (Fig. 10.3).
  • The majority of deaths in this age group were due to unintentional injuries (mainly motor vehicle collisions) comprising 44% of deaths; distantly followed by suicide (8%). These leading causes of death ranked the same for Ontario and the Peer Group (Fig. 10.3).
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Jargon Explained

Rate (unadjusted or crude)

Total number of events (e.g., deaths, births, hospitalizations) divided by the total population for a given time period and geography.

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Perinatal Conditions 

Conditions which originate in the perinatal period, i.e. the period immediately before, during and after birth.

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Rate (unadjusted or crude) 

Total number of events (e.g., deaths, births, hospitalizations) divided by the total population for a given time period and geography.

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