MHLU - Health Status Resource

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A (10) | B (3) | C (12) | D (3) | E (4) | F (6) | G (1) | H (11) | I (17) | K (1) | L (13) | M (7) | N (6) | O (5) | P (19) | R (4) | S (26) | T (5) | U (3) | V (1) | W (3) | Y (1)

Self-harm injuries

The group of injuries included in this category for emergency room visits are those where the individual purposely inflicted poisoning or injury on themselves. It also includes attempted suicide.

Self-perceived health

Population aged 12 and over who rated their own health as either excellent or very good when asked, “In general, how would you say your health is: excellent, very good, good, fair or poor?”

Self-perceived mental health

Population aged 12 and over who reported perceiving their own mental health status as being excellent or very good when asked, “In general, would you say your mental health is: excellent, very good, good, fair or poor?

Self-Reported Chronic Health Conditions Survey Question

The question in the Canadian Community Health Survey is “Now I’d like to ask about certain chronic health conditions which you may have. We are interested in ‘long-term conditions’ which are expected to last or have already lasted 6 months or more and that have been diagnosed by a health professional”.

Seniors Dependency Ratio

Number of people aged 65 years and older divided by the number of people aged 20 to 64 multiplied by 100. (Also known as Elderly Dependency Ratio.)

Sex of person

Refers to the sex assigned at birth based on a person’s reproductive system and other physical characteristics.1 A person’s sex may differ from a person’s gender; a person’s gender may change over time and reflects the gender that a person internally feels and/or the gender a person publicly expresses.2

1. Statistics Canada. Sex of Person [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 9]. Available from: http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p3Var.pl?Function=DEC&Id=24101

2. Statistics Canada. Gender of Person [Internet]. 2018 [cited 2018 Nov 9]. Available from: http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p3Var.pl?Function=DECI&Id=463349

Sex ratio at birth

The ratio of males born alive per 100 females born alive.

Sleep Guidelines

Adults aged 18 to 64 need 7 to 9 hours of sleep a night and adults aged 65 and older need 7 to 8 hours a night.1

1.  Hirshkowitz M, Whiton K, Albert SM, Alessi C, Bruni O, DonCarlos L, Hazen N, Herman J, Hillard PJ, Katz ES, Kheirandish-Gozal L, Neubauer DN, O’Donnell AE, Ohayon M, Peever J, Rawding R, Sachdeva RC, Setters B, Ware JC. National Sleep Foundation’s updated sleep duration recommendations: final report. Sleep Health [Internet]. 2015 Dec [cited 2019 Apr 17];1(4):233–43. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2352721815001606?...

Sleep Guidelines in Youth

12 and 13 years olds need between 9 and 11 hours per night and 14-17 year olds should have between 8 and 10 hours per night, with consistent bed and wake-up times.1

1.  Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology. Canadian 24-Hour Movement Guidelines: An Integration of Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviour, and Sleep [Internet]. Ottawa (ON): Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology; c2019 [cited 2019 Apr 17]. Available from: https://csepguidelines.ca/

Small Counts

The stability of a rate is dependent on the number of events that contribute to that rate. Therefore, rates in small populations are often unstable due to the relatively small number of events that occur each year. When comparing trends over time between Middlesex-London, the province and the Peer Group, we often see a larger fluctuation in rates locally than for Ontario, in which the trends are fairly smooth from year to year – this concept needs to be considered when interpreting the time trends in this resource. Furthermore, the following strategies were implemented in order to present the most stable, reliable rates at the local level:

  • Rates based on counts less than 5 have been suppressed;  
  • Directly age-standardized rates have only been derived where there were 20 or more events across all age groups;
  • For most unadjusted rates and rates of rare outcomes, multiple years of data have been collapsed to present an average annual rate. 

Small counts

The stability of a rate is dependent on the number of events that contribute to that rate. Therefore, rates in small populations are often unstable due to the relatively small number of events that occur each year. When comparing trends over time between Middlesex-London, the province and the Peer Group, we often see a larger fluctuation in rates locally than for Ontario, in which the trends are fairly smooth from year to year – this concept needs to be considered when interpreting the time trends and the confidence intervals in this resource.

Small-for-Gestational Age Rate

The number of live births with a birth weight below the tenth percentile of birth weights for their gestational age and sex, per 100 live births.

Smog

Smog is made up of predominantly ground-level ozone and fine particulate matter. Ozone has an impact on smog levels primarily in summer whereas fine particulate matter elevates smog levels all year. http://airqualityontario.com/press/faq.php

Smoke Free Ontario Act

The Smoke-Free Ontario Act is legislation enacted in 2006 that bans smoking from enclosed workplaces and public places in Ontario. In 2009, smokers were banned from smoking in cars with children under the age of 16 (Ontario Ministry of Health Promotion, 2010).

Social Competence domain

Assesses children’s readiness to explore new things, their approaches to learning, the amount of responsibility and respect they show, and their overall social competence.1

1. Offord Centre for Child Studies. EDI in Ontario over Time [Internet]. Hamilton, ON: McMaster University, 2018 [cited 2019 Mar 26]. Available from: https://edi.offordcentre.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/EDI-in-Ontari...

Standard Drink Size

A standard drink is 13.6 g of alcohol, which translates into 5 oz of 12% wine, 1.5 oz of 40% distilled alcohol (rye, gin, rum, etc.), or 12 oz of 5% beer.

Standardized Hospitalization Ratio (SHR)

Actual number of hospitalizations in the Middlesex-London population divided by the number of hospitalizations expected if the population had the same age and sex specific rates as the population of Ontario.

Standardized Hospitalization Ratio Interpretation (SHR)

  • An SHR of 1 indicates that, after adjusting for the effect of differences in age and sex structure between the geographic areas, the hospitalization rate in Middlesex-London is the same as the rate for Ontario.
  • An SHR of greater than 1 indicates that, after adjusting for the effect of differences in age and sex structure between the geographic areas, there is a higher hospitalization rate in Middlesex-London than in Ontario.
  • An SHR of less than 1 indicates that, after adjusting for the effect of differences in age or sex structure between the geographic areas, there is a lower hospitalization rate in Middlesex-London than in Ontario.
  • The vertical black line above and below the dot indicates the upper and lower confidence intervals. When the confidence interval does not cross 1, the difference between the rate for Middlesex-London and Ontario is statistically significant.

Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR)

Actual number of deaths in the Middlesex-London population divided by the number of deaths expected if the population had the same age and sex specific mortality rates as the population of Ontario.

Standardized Mortality Ratio (SMR) Interpretation

  • An SMR of 1 indicates that, after adjusting for the effect of differences in age and sex structure between the geographic areas, the mortality rate in Middlesex-London is the same as the rate for Ontario.
  • An SMR of greater than 1 indicates that, after adjusting for the effect of differences in age and sex structure between the geographic areas, there is a higher mortality rate in Middlesex-London than in Ontario.
  • An SMR of less than 1 indicates that, after adjusting for the effect of differences in age or sex structure between the geographic areas, there is a lower mortality rate in Middlesex-London than in Ontario.
  • The vertical black line above and below the dot indicates the upper and lower confidence intervals. When the confidence interval does not cross 1, the difference between the rate for Middlesex-London and Ontario is statistically significant.

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